The colorpurple essay contest

There's no note of sexuality here, which is also important. Celie was raped repeatedly by Mr., her husband, and her step-father. She grew numb to it, which can happen with repeated abuse especially when it happens so often. The only sex she ever enjoyed was the completely consensual and compassionate time she shared with Shug. That makes Celie possibly gay/lesbian/bisexual/queer, or even asexual because she wasn't actually concerned about the act but more the emotional attachment and connection with Shug. Without any other positive sexual ex... Read more →

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When Walker published the novel in 1982, one of the most highly praised features of the book was its use of language. Mel Watkins of The New York Book Review commented that the novel “assumes a lyrical cadence of its own...The cumulative effect is a novel that is convincing because of the authenticity of its folk voice.” The language was particularly important to Walker. She later explained what happened after she sent her finished novel to a leading black women’s magazine which, she believed, probably would recognize its merits quicker than anybody else. The magazine turned the novel down, however, on the ground that “black people don’t talk like that” (Garrett & McCue, 1990, p. 229). The subsequent success of the novel exposes such totalizing statements as untrue, for it is Celie’s powerfully idiomatic voice that captures her specific situation and that of so many African Americans of her time.

The colorpurple essay contest

the colorpurple essay contest

When Walker published the novel in 1982, one of the most highly praised features of the book was its use of language. Mel Watkins of The New York Book Review commented that the novel “assumes a lyrical cadence of its own...The cumulative effect is a novel that is convincing because of the authenticity of its folk voice.” The language was particularly important to Walker. She later explained what happened after she sent her finished novel to a leading black women’s magazine which, she believed, probably would recognize its merits quicker than anybody else. The magazine turned the novel down, however, on the ground that “black people don’t talk like that” (Garrett & McCue, 1990, p. 229). The subsequent success of the novel exposes such totalizing statements as untrue, for it is Celie’s powerfully idiomatic voice that captures her specific situation and that of so many African Americans of her time.

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