Resource curse thesis latin america

The best example of an advanced nation that has zero resources to start with is Singapore. Kicked out from Malaysia in the 60’s with no resources including sufficient water supply, Singapore reinvented itself and invested on its human capital and prepared itself for every stage of world development. When open to global challenges such as job outsourcing, Singapore’s consistent high saving rate and public investment worldwide has helped the nation to reinvest in its infrastructure to attract foreign talent and businesses. Having said that, as a global city, the income disparity in Singapore is widening significantly. A great city economically understands its position, competition and plan for the future and not entirely lives for today.

Tony Johnson: Scientism is the faith that science already understands everything. There are two kinds of faith: faith in things which cannot be proven, and faith in things which have been disproven. Your faith lies in the latter. Many times science has reversed itself. Margarine good for your heart, oops, it’s bad for your heart. Eric’s faith is in a procedure which is not fully understood. Sometimes it works, and sometimes doing the exact same thing (or so we think) it doesn’t work. That said, it sometimes works and it’s relatively harmless. A substitute for medical attention? No, but it can be a precursor given that it calms a patient and reduces white coat anxiety.

Let’s discuss another example that may suggest a different motivation. In the north of the Chocó is a region called Urabá that also spills into the department of Antioquia. In this region between 1996 and 1997, 70% of the population of two Afro-Colombian communities Curvaradó and Jiguamiandó was displaced by paramilitaries and the army (see the report ). The people were replaced by tropical palm, and by 2005 the palm plantations reached 35,000 hectares. The Inter-Ecclesial Commission of Peace and Justice reported that by 2005, 106 people in the area had been assassinated or were missing, 40,000 people were displaced from their homes; there had been 19 raids and burning of hamlets, and 15 cases of torture.

In 2007, Elinor Ostrom along with her colleague Charlotte Hess, did succeed in extending the commons debate to knowledge, approaching knowledge as a complex ecosystem that operates as a common – a shared resource that is subject to social dilemmas. The focus here was on the ready availability of digital forms of knowledge and associated possibilities to store, access and share it as a common. The connection between knowledge and commons may be made through identifying typical problems associated with natural resource commons, such as congestion, overharvesting, pollution and inequities, which also apply to knowledge. Then, effective alternatives (community-based, non-private, non-state), in line with those of natural commons (involving social rules, appropriate property rights and management structures), solutions are proposed. Thus, the commons metaphor is applied to social practice around knowledge. It is in this context that the present work proceeds, discussing the creation of depositories of knowledge through the organised, voluntary contributions of scholars (the research community, itself a social common), the problems that such knowledge commons might face (such as free-riding or disappearing assets), and the protection of ­knowledge commons from enclosure and commodification (in the form of ­intellectual ­property legislation, patenting, licensing and overpricing). [18] At this point, it is important to note the nature of knowledge and its complex and multi-layered qualities of non-rivalry and non-excludability. Unlike natural commons – which are both rival and excludable (only one person can use any one item or portion at a time and in so doing they use it up, it is consumed) and characterised by scarcity (they can be replenished but there are limits to this, such that consumption/destruction may overtake production/creation) – knowledge commons are characterised by abundance (they are non-rival and non-excludable and thus, in principle, not scarce, so not impelling competition and compelling governance). This abundance of knowledge commons has been celebrated through alternative models of knowledge production, such as Commons Based Peer Production (CBPP), and embodied in the free software movement. The CBPP model showed the power of networked, open collaboration and non-material incentives to produce better quality products (mainly software). [19]

This list of important quotations from “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker will help you work with the essay topics and thesis statements above by allowing you to support your claims. All of the important quotes from “The Color Purple” listed here correspond, at least in some way, to the paper topics above and by themselves can give you great ideas for an essay by offering quotes about other themes, symbols, imagery, and motifs than those already mentioned. All quotes from “The Color Purple” contain page numbers as well. Look at the bottom of the page to identify which edition of “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker they are referring to.

Resource curse thesis latin america

resource curse thesis latin america

In 2007, Elinor Ostrom along with her colleague Charlotte Hess, did succeed in extending the commons debate to knowledge, approaching knowledge as a complex ecosystem that operates as a common – a shared resource that is subject to social dilemmas. The focus here was on the ready availability of digital forms of knowledge and associated possibilities to store, access and share it as a common. The connection between knowledge and commons may be made through identifying typical problems associated with natural resource commons, such as congestion, overharvesting, pollution and inequities, which also apply to knowledge. Then, effective alternatives (community-based, non-private, non-state), in line with those of natural commons (involving social rules, appropriate property rights and management structures), solutions are proposed. Thus, the commons metaphor is applied to social practice around knowledge. It is in this context that the present work proceeds, discussing the creation of depositories of knowledge through the organised, voluntary contributions of scholars (the research community, itself a social common), the problems that such knowledge commons might face (such as free-riding or disappearing assets), and the protection of ­knowledge commons from enclosure and commodification (in the form of ­intellectual ­property legislation, patenting, licensing and overpricing). [18] At this point, it is important to note the nature of knowledge and its complex and multi-layered qualities of non-rivalry and non-excludability. Unlike natural commons – which are both rival and excludable (only one person can use any one item or portion at a time and in so doing they use it up, it is consumed) and characterised by scarcity (they can be replenished but there are limits to this, such that consumption/destruction may overtake production/creation) – knowledge commons are characterised by abundance (they are non-rival and non-excludable and thus, in principle, not scarce, so not impelling competition and compelling governance). This abundance of knowledge commons has been celebrated through alternative models of knowledge production, such as Commons Based Peer Production (CBPP), and embodied in the free software movement. The CBPP model showed the power of networked, open collaboration and non-material incentives to produce better quality products (mainly software). [19]

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