Essay on the human brain

But Rich was also a masterful writer of prose at the intersection of the philosophical, the political, and the deeply personal. In her essay titled “Women and Honor: Some Notes on Lying,” originally read at the Hartwick Women Writers’ Workshop in June of 1975 and eventually included in the altogether fantastic anthology On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978 ( public library ), Rich adds to history’s finest definitions of love with eloquence that resonates with particularly poignant beauty in these days of historic change for the freedom and dignity of love:

“For a tear is an intellectual thing,” the great subversive 19th-century poet William Blake wrote, railing against the Deists, classical and contemporary; he believed they had stripped religion of its signal call for forgiveness, assigning too much authority to a single God and making human life untenable in its guilty abrasions. Tears are intellectual because they come from thoughts that spill over the body’s containing well; they are the secretion of excess we assign to emotion; perhaps emotion itself is simply caused by a surfeit of thought. One tries to unbind these durable dualities, to allow for the morphological shift that might allow the human creature to be complex but integrated, not divided into anatomical parts, all nouns and no transitive verb. We are not yet mechanical, technological things, we are intellectual — thinking — beings, and we cry when stirred beyond the capture of signifying Logos, which relents into flows of passionate silence. Perhaps this flow is the very proof that we cannot put our feelings in one place and our thoughts in another, the bleak result of a certain rationalism that threatens to overtake our civility — our capacity to forgive — and wants to make all ideas into abstractions, rigid and blunt, free of secretions.

About mya, Africa underwent climate change,  resulting in the changing of hominin habitats from more closed and wet to more open and arid, which led to an increase in the prevalence of tougher foods, such as roots and tubers.  It is around this time that the robust australopiths ( Paranthropus ) and early Homo appear on the landscape.  This is also about the time that the first stone choppers (a stone, often roughly spherical, from which several large flakes have been broken to produce a sharp edge or point) are found in Ethiopia and Tanzania.  There is no definitive evidence that links either Paranthropus or early Homo to the manufacture of stone tools.   However, many scientists support a link between stone tools and early Homo rather than Paranthropus due to the relatively larger brain of the former.  H. rudolfensis had a relatively large brain combined with very large teeth, making it uniquely suited to handle these new climactic challenges.

At one time or another most of us have seen Michelangelo's "Creation of Man" panel from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. When Michelangelo painted the chapel ceiling in 1512 he actually never named the various panels, instead, we of the so called modern age, have given them names. Dr. Frank Lynn Meshberger of St. John's Medical Center in Anderson, Indiana believes that the famous "creation" panel contains an image that has been misunderstood for 487 years--a brain that symbolizes God bestowing intellect on man. Over the previous half millennium scholars have interpreted the painting to mean God bestowed life on man. Dr. Meshberger however notes Adam's open eyes and believes this suggests that he's already alive. Dr. Meshberger researched Michelangelo's private life and found that the artist had deep religious beliefs and used to dissect cadavers to study the human form for his art. The following drawing illustrate how Dr. Meshberger identifies many of the brain's structures inthe image of God's swirling cloak and the surrounding angels.

Essay on the human brain

essay on the human brain

At one time or another most of us have seen Michelangelo's "Creation of Man" panel from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. When Michelangelo painted the chapel ceiling in 1512 he actually never named the various panels, instead, we of the so called modern age, have given them names. Dr. Frank Lynn Meshberger of St. John's Medical Center in Anderson, Indiana believes that the famous "creation" panel contains an image that has been misunderstood for 487 years--a brain that symbolizes God bestowing intellect on man. Over the previous half millennium scholars have interpreted the painting to mean God bestowed life on man. Dr. Meshberger however notes Adam's open eyes and believes this suggests that he's already alive. Dr. Meshberger researched Michelangelo's private life and found that the artist had deep religious beliefs and used to dissect cadavers to study the human form for his art. The following drawing illustrate how Dr. Meshberger identifies many of the brain's structures inthe image of God's swirling cloak and the surrounding angels.

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