Corporal punishment in south african schools essay

  • Corporal punishment in general:
    Corporal Punishment by David Benatar, Philosophy Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    Dr Benatar considers the CP of youngsters from a moral and ethical point of view. He makes several excellent points, tackling in turn each of several common anti-CP assertions -- that it leads to abuse, that it is degrading, that it either stems from and/or causes sexual deviance, that it "teaches the wrong lesson" (this bit is particularly good) -- and finds none of them especially persuasive. And how refreshing to have a distinguished academic point out that the debate is too polarised, with advocates and opponents alike typically adopting absolute black-and-white positions when common sense would suggest that the reality is a series of shades of grey. Well worth reading.

    Hate Mail!
    C. Farrell has an exchange of views with a hostile correspondent.

    No federal policy exists on corporal punishment in schools. The . Supreme Court has ruled that it's an issue left to the states. In the 1977 case Ingraham v. Wright , students argued that Florida's corporal punishment policy violated their rights under the Eighth Amendment, which bars cruel and unusual punishment, and their 14th Amendment rights to "procedural due process." The high court upheld Florida' s policy, reasoning that the student was provided ample due process, and found the Eighth Amendment inapplicable, since it was intended to protect convicted criminals.

        See also this May 1978 news item about unofficial slippering at a famous boys' comprehensive school in inner London. This was a rare case of the media writing about the existence of the slipper in their coverage of school CP, which usually dealt only with the cane. In this instance the local newspaper evidently thought it remarkable; but journalists have more often than not been poorly informed on these matters, and the anecdotal evidence suggests that there were more, maybe a lot more, slipperings than canings in English schools, at least in the 1960s and 1970s.

    The Lowdown:
    As the report notes, corporal punishment is banned in most juvenile correction facilities in the ., and yet it continues in public schools. The legal paradox can be traced to a 1977 Supreme Court ruling that found the Eighth Amendment only protects convicted criminals from cruel and unusual punishment — not students confined to a classroom. In its plea to convince federal and state lawmakers to impose a national ban on the practice, the authors point out yet another paradox, using the words of a special-ed teacher in Mississippi: "I see these children who get in fights and then get paddled. So you're supposed to teach them not to hit by hitting them?"

    Corporal punishment in south african schools essay

    corporal punishment in south african schools essay

    The Lowdown:
    As the report notes, corporal punishment is banned in most juvenile correction facilities in the ., and yet it continues in public schools. The legal paradox can be traced to a 1977 Supreme Court ruling that found the Eighth Amendment only protects convicted criminals from cruel and unusual punishment — not students confined to a classroom. In its plea to convince federal and state lawmakers to impose a national ban on the practice, the authors point out yet another paradox, using the words of a special-ed teacher in Mississippi: "I see these children who get in fights and then get paddled. So you're supposed to teach them not to hit by hitting them?"

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    corporal punishment in south african schools essay