Alexander pope essay on

The second epistle abruptly turns to focus on the principles that guide human action. The rest of this section focuses largely on “self-love,” an eighteenth-century term for self-maintenance and fulfillment. It was common during Pope’s lifetime to view the passions as the force determining human action. Typically instinctual, the immediate object of the passions was seen as pleasure. According to Pope’s philosophy, each man has a “ruling passion” that subordinates the others. In contrast with the accepted eighteenth-century views of the passions, Pope’s doctrine of the “ruling passion” is quite original. It seems clear that with this idea, Pope tries to explain why certain individual behave in distinct ways, seemingly governed by a particular desire. He does not, however, make this explicit in the poem.

An Essay on Criticism is one of the first major poems written by the English writer Alexander Pope (1688–1744). It is the source of the famous quotations "To err is human, to forgive divine," "A little learning is a dang'rous thing" (frequently misquoted as "A little knowledge is a dang'rous thing"), and "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread." It first appeared in 1711 [1] after having been written in 1709, and it is clear from Pope's correspondence [2] that many of the poem's ideas had existed in prose form since at least 1706. Composed in heroic couplets (pairs of adjacent rhyming lines of iambic pentameter ) and written in the Horatian mode of satire, it is a verse essay primarily concerned with how writers and critics behave in the new literary commerce of Pope's contemporary age. The poem covers a range of good criticism and advice, and represents many of the chief literary ideals of Pope's age.

Languages with up to 50 books: Afrikaans   Aleut   Arabic   Arapaho   Breton   Bulgarian   Caló   Catalan   Cebuano   Czech   Estonian   Farsi   Frisian   Friulian   Gaelic, Scottish   Galician   Gamilaraay   Greek, Ancient   Hebrew   Icelandic   Iloko   Interlingua   Inuktitut   Irish   Japanese   Kashubian   Khasi   Korean   Lithuanian   Maori   Mayan Languages   Middle English   Nahuatl   Napoletano-Calabrese   Navajo   North American Indian   Norwegian   Occitan   Ojibwa   Old English   Polish   Romanian   Russian   Sanskrit   Serbian   Slovenian   Tagabawa   Telugu   Welsh   Yiddish  

In this period, Pope was also employed by the publisher Jacob Tonson to produce an opulent new edition of Shakespeare. When it finally appeared, in 1725, this edition silently "regularised" Shakespeare's metre and rewrote his verse in a number of places. Pope also demoted about 1560 lines of Shakespearean material to footnotes, arguing that they were so "excessively bad" that Shakespeare could never have written them. (Other lines were excluded from the edition altogether.) In 1726, the lawyer, poet and pantomime deviser Lewis Theobald published a scathing pamphlet called Shakespeare Restored , which catalogued the errors in Pope's work and suggested a number of revisions to the text.

Alexander pope essay on

alexander pope essay on

In this period, Pope was also employed by the publisher Jacob Tonson to produce an opulent new edition of Shakespeare. When it finally appeared, in 1725, this edition silently "regularised" Shakespeare's metre and rewrote his verse in a number of places. Pope also demoted about 1560 lines of Shakespearean material to footnotes, arguing that they were so "excessively bad" that Shakespeare could never have written them. (Other lines were excluded from the edition altogether.) In 1726, the lawyer, poet and pantomime deviser Lewis Theobald published a scathing pamphlet called Shakespeare Restored , which catalogued the errors in Pope's work and suggested a number of revisions to the text.

Media:

alexander pope essay onalexander pope essay onalexander pope essay onalexander pope essay on